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There are two kinds of people: those who can deduce when given incomplete data

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I wrote music I hope you like it it's just a rough sketch this collab is really cool Johnny Clyde is the bomb etc etc

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Ok I can't really compose without doing some orchestrating while I'm at it so here's what I came up with. Still just a basic sketch though. Hope it does it justice :O 

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King Edmund Ironside was King of England for a few months in 1016. Unforunately he died when a viking hid in his toilet and stabbed him in the anus.


King George II was the King of Germany in the 1700s. He was fat and in poor health. One day, he took some hot chocolate and went to the toilet. He then died from, as they put it, "overextertions on the privy."

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I DID A THING WITH MADROND'S THING YAY

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Sometimes I decide to branch out and try new things instead of pulling out all my old tried and true composing tricks.


This was not one of those times.


This was inspired by The Dark collab, I pictured walking around some naturey area at night, finally feeling content again after weeks/months of restlessness. yay?


PS- I'm resourcing "nightsfall" because this had originally been my attempt at rescoring it. This went in a different direction ultimately, but the inspiration was definitely there.

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Name: Megan Carnes (or megancarnes)


Location: Chicago, USA


Bio: Video game/film composer and violin teacher (enjoys jobs, is perpetually broke).


RECord used: http://www.hitrecord.org/records/1395414


Testimonial: My original thought when starting to compose the score for this was to use only synths or weirdly distorted instruments. But, as usually happens with my pieces, the piano and strings managed to sneak in there. JeffPeff later added the woodwinds, and I couldn't be happier with the result!

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If I hear a noise with a distinct musical note (like a machine hum or something), I always have to say out loud to the person I'm with what note it is (if I'm alone, I whisper it to myself). Furthermore, if the note is slightly sharp or flat, I get really irrationally angry.


I didn't realize this until my boyfriend pointed it out, but if I'm being sarcastic, I talk out of the left side of my mouth.


When I drink, my Chicago accent comes out in full force.


I have a terrible habit of only learning the first page of any piano piece. Oddly, I don't have this problem with violin or any other instruments.


One of my nervous habits is to weirdly pet my own tattoos with my thumb.


I never know what to do when somebody wants me to pose for a photo, so I usually end up looking super awkward.


If I'm drunk and meeting someone new, there's a 90% chance I will mention to them that Beethoven was only 5'3.


I curl my tongue before I sneeze. My dad does the same.

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(I plan on making a video RECord of this later, but I figured I'd get the idea down as a text RECord first. A lot of what I'm saying sadly doesn't mean much without me playing the various intervals on keyboard, which I plan to do in the video).


The number two is important when it comes to the relationship between notes in music.


Music used to be just a single line- notes sung one at a time, melody only. But around the Middle Ages (perhaps earlier- we can't be too sure), people began experimenting with putting different notes together, also known as harmony. Maybe it was an accident at first- people accidentally sang two notes at the same time and were like "hey, that sounds cool!" Sadly, we may never know.


The specific aspect of harmony I want to talk about here is the interval. An interval it the relationship between two pitches.


To keep things simple, I am only going to talk about the intervals in Western music within an octave. In scientific terms, an octave is the interval between a note and another note that is half or double the original note's frequency. In musical terms, it simply means I am going from a C to the next C up or down (or D to the next D, A to the next A, etc). An octave is two of the same note, but one is higher or lower than the other (think of a deep voiced man and a high voiced woman singing the same song. They'll sing the same notes, but obviously the man will sing them lower). In music theory an octave is often called a perfect octave.


Unison (or perfect unison) is exactly what it sounds like: two of the exact same note playing at the same time. On keyboard it just looks like I'm playing one note, but if you have, say, a piano and a violin playing in unison, you get a much different sound than either of the instruments could have made on their own. However, there isn't much going on there as far as harmony goes.


The next intervals I'm going to discuss are the perfect fourth and perfect fifth, but at this point you're probably wondering why I'm calling these, along with the octave and unison intervals, perfect. It's simply because in ancient music history, these intervals were considered the most purely consonant, even if others weren't necessarily dissonant. In case you were unaware, consonance is when combinations of notes are considered stable and sound pleasant to the ear. Dissonance is the opposite- combinations of notes that are considered unstable and sound unpleasant to the ear. Our perceptions of consonance and dissonance are partly cultural, but there's also a scientific/mathematical basis for it. Without getting into too much detail (because I am neither a physicist or mathematician), consonance happens when the sound waves fit together nicely- for example, in an octave, there are two waves of one note for every one wave of another. Conversly, dissonant notes are something more like 11/12ths of a wave for every 1 wave. 


Getting back into it, perfect fourths and perfect fifths are similar. A perfect fourth is the first two notes of "Here Comes The Bride" and a perfect fifth is the first two notes of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star." These intervals sound nice, but based on the two notes alone we don't have a way of telling what key a song may be in (although if I were to play a perfect fourth or fifth right now you'd probably think it sounded major because the two songs I just mentioned were both in major keys). The intervals that determine whether a scale will be major or minor (we're not getting into fancy scales today) will come a bit later.


Now that I've explained all the perfect intervals, I'm going to go up the scale and explain the rest. These will all be major or minor. Basically, minor means small and major means large. Pretty simple. There is one interval that is neither, and I'll save that for last.


The first interval after a unison is a minor second. If you play this interval repeatedly, you have the Jaws theme. Played together, these notes sound really ugly. They are clearly dissonant. Our ears are not used to hearing notes that are so close to each other played together.


A major second is next. Played separately, you have the beginning of a scale. Played together, you have the beginning of chopsticks. These notes are also dissonant- not quite as ugly as the minor second, but still not particularly pleasant.


Now we have a minor third. A third is the interval that determines whether a scale is major or minor (depending on the relationship between the root note and the third). A minor third makes up the first two notes of a minor chord. If I play you a minor third, you would probably think it sounds sad, because western music tends to associate minor keys with sadness and major keys with happiness. A minor third is consonant. It sounds nice.


A major third is similar to a minor third, except that it's totally happy sounding instead of sad sounding. When there is a major third between the root and third of a scale or chord, it will usually be major. It is also a consonant interval.


Minor and major sixths are also consonant. My favorite use for sixths is to have them playing parallel lines- it tends to make for really pretty harmonization.


Sevenths are dissonant on their own, but they are part of seventh chords, which are awesome, but definitely more modern than your average major or minor triad. A minor seventh makes up the lowest and highest note of mm7 and Mm7 chord. A major seventh is just as dissonant as a minor second. However, they are used to make MM7 chords, which are some of the prettiest chords in the history of the universe, in my humble opinion.


Last but not least, we have the triad, aka the most metal interval. A tritone cuts an octave exactly in half and sounds incredibly dissonant, probably more so than any other interval. In ancient times, composers wouldn't use it in their music because it was so dissonant. They nicknamed is "Diabolus in Musica" which translates to the devil in music. Awesome.


As a giant music theory nerd, it is endlessly fascinating how these mathematical relationships between notes, between sound waves, have such important meanings in our culture. Once you start adding more notes and getting into chords, the relationships become even more important. But I'm going to stop there. Because this is only the number two. Not the number... more than two.

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Time is a man-made concept, but it shapes so much of our understanding of the world. We could do segments about time in music, our concepts of past/present/future, things changing over time/aging, timing (like comedic timing or how timing can affect the outcome of a relationship).

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The music nerd in me immediately thinks of musical notes and how they work together, but this could also refer to people with different skill sets working together to achieve something, nature (I.e. Animal and plant life working together in harmony to create an ecosystem), or pretty  much anything that involves different parts working together to create a whole.

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I cannot find the collab but I write music and you should give me challenges. I may forget to complete them but I will try not to.


READY SET GO I LOVE YOU


 


UPDATE: I have found the collab.

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