View Grid Expanded
100_0627
by Kalymi
Released
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

What if the dream you were chasing turned around and chased you?

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
0
resources
results
0
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

it was an edgy perspective.


 


[Scenes from a fictional film]

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
424 Hits
14 Recommends
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

One day his past showed up at the door.

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
739 Hits
32 Recommends
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

Mishaps of Full-time Fatherhood


Slate Rising


2009


After a half-century of filming boring documentaries about rocks, producer/director Slate Rising finally made his mark with this explosive, low-budget comedy. Set in a New Jersey neighborhood. Mishaps of Full-time Fatherhood, inspired by his screenwriter friend, Jeff Damnink's, time spent at home with his four young children during the writer's strike of 2007, is taken straight out of Damnink's daily journals describing his struggle to adapt to and survive the daily pressures of domestic life. In Slate's deft hands, the film, featuring certifiable neighbors, carpool drag races, and seemingly simple household tasks gone terribly wrong, showcases one man's triumph over the jungles of suburbia.


 

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
150 Hits
7 Recommends
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

1. All the world's a stage


2. The stages of life


3. To stage an event


 


http://www.thefreedictionary.com/stage:


stage (steɪdʒ)
n
1. a distinct step or period of development, growth, or progress: a child at the toddling stage.
2. a raised area or platform
3. (Theatre) the platform in a theatre where actors perform
4. (Theatre) the stage the theatre as a profession
5. any scene regarded as a setting for an event or action
6. a portion of a journey or a stopping place after such a portion
7. (Automotive Engineering) short for stagecoach
8. (Automotive Engineering) Brit a division of a bus route for which there is a fixed fare
9. (Astronautics) one of the separate propulsion units of a rocket that can be jettisoned when it has burnt out. See also multistage1
10. (Biology) any of the various distinct periods of growth or development in the life of an organism, esp an insect: a larval stage; pupal stage.
11. (Biology) the organism itself at such a period of growth
12. (Geological Science) a small stratigraphical unit; a subdivision of a rock series or system
13. (General Physics) the platform on a microscope on which the specimen is mounted for examination
14. (Electronics) electronics a part of a complex circuit, esp one of a number of transistors with the associated elements required to amplify a signal in an amplifier
15. (Education) a university subject studied for one academic year: Stage II French.
16. by easy stages in easy stages not hurriedly: he learned French by easy stages.
vb
17. (Theatre) (tr) to perform (a play), esp on a stage: we are going to stage ``Hamlet''.
18. (Theatre) (tr) to set the action of (a play) in a particular time or place
19. (tr) to plan, organize, and carry out (an event)
20. (Automotive Engineering) (intr) to travel by stagecoach
[C13: from Old French estage position, from Vulgar Latin staticum (unattested), from Latin stāre to stand]

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
150 Hits
4 Recommends
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

In which the invisible family have dinner at a Japanese steakhouse.

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
51 Hits
5 Recommends
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

In which the invisible family hold pinwheels. A slight breeze comes up and the wheels turn slowly. Then, the wind gets stronger and turns into a thunderstorm as the pinwheels spin out of control and out of their hands straight into the eye of the storm.

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
56 Hits
3 Recommends
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

In which the invisible family feed the birds in central park.

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
341 Hits
22 Recommends
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

In which the invisible family run the iditarod

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
17 Hits
1 Recommends
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

In which a lightbulb goes off in Billy's head

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
241 Hits
12 Recommends
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

Once upon a time in the country of Japan there lived two frogs, one of whom made his home in a ditch near the town of Osaka, on the sea coast, while the other dwelt in a clear little stream which ran through the city of Kyoto. At such a great distance apart, they had never even heard of each other; but, funnily enough, the idea came into both their heads at once that they should like to see a little of the world, and the frog who lived at Kyoto wanted to visit Osaka, and the frog who lived at Osaka wished to go to Kyoto, where the great Mikado had his palace.


So one fine morning in the spring they both set out along the road that led from Kyoto to Osaka, one from one end and the other from the other. The journey was more tiring than they expected, for they did not know much about traveling, and halfway between the two towns there arose a mountain which had to be climbed. It took them a long time and a great many hops to reach the top, but there they were at last, and what was the surprise of each to see another frog before him!


They looked at each other for a moment without speaking, and then fell into conversation, explaining the cause of their meeting so far from their homes. It was delightful to find that they both felt the same wish--to learn a little more of their native country--and as there was no sort of hurry they stretched themselves out in a cool, damp place, and agreed that they would have a good rest before they parted to go their ways.


"What a pity we are not bigger," said the Osaka frog; "for then we could see both towns from here, and tell if it is worth our while going on."


"Oh, that is easily managed," returned the Kyoto frog. "We have only got to stand up on our hind legs, and hold onto each other, and then we can each look at the town he is traveling to."


This idea pleased the Osaka frog so much that he at once jumped up and put his front paws on the shoulder of his friend, who had risen also. There they both stood, stretching themselves as high as they could, and holding each other tightly, so that they might not fall down. The Kyoto frog turned his nose towards Osaka, and the Osaka frog turned his nose towards Kyoto; but the foolish things forgot that when they stood up their great eyes lay in the backs of their heads, and that though their noses might point to the places to which they wanted to go, their eyes beheld the places from which they had come.


"Dear me!" cried the Osaka frog, "Kyoto is exactly like Osaka. It is certainly not worth such a long journey. I shall go home!"


"If I had had any idea that Osaka was only a copy of Kyoto I should never have traveled all this way," exclaimed the frog from Kyoto, and as he spoke he took his hands from his friend's shoulders, and they both fell down on the grass. Then they took a polite farewell of each other, and set off for home again, and to the end of their lives they believed that Osaka and Kyoto, which are as different to look at as two towns can be, were as alike as two peas.


Source: Andrew Lang, The Violet Fairy Book (London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1901), pp. 125-126.


 

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
106 Hits
3 Recommends
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

There was the Chief of the Mouth of the River and the Chief of the Upper Current of the River. The former was very vainglorious, and therefore wished to put the latter to shame, or to kill him by engaging him in the attempt to perform something impossible. So he sent for him and said: “The sea may be a useful thing, in so far as it is the original home of the fish which come up the river. But it is very destructive in stormy weather, when it beats wildly upon the beach. Do you now drink it dry, so that there may be rivers and dry land only. If you cannot do so, then forfeit all your possessions.” The other (greatly to the vainglorious man’s surprise) said: “I accept the challenge.”



So, on their going down together to the beach, the Chief of the Upper Current of the River took a cup, and scooped up a little of the sea-water with it, drank a few drops, and said: “In the sea-water itself there is no harm. It is some of the rivers flowing into it that are poisonous. Do you therefore first close the mouths of all the rivers both in Aino-land and in Japan, and prevent them from flowing into the sea, and then I will undertake to drink the sea dry.” Here-upon the Chief of the Mouth of the River felt ashamed, acknowledged his error, and gave all his treasures to his rival.


(Written down from memory. Told by Ishanashte, 18th November, 1886.)


Public Domain: http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/aino-folktales-1888/

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
109 Hits
4 Recommends
Document_icon
Text_notecard_shadow_top_left

Said the tiger to the fox: “let us run a race from the top of the world to the bottom of the world, and he who wins it shall be lord of the world!” The fox agreed, and off the tiger bounded, but without noticing that the fox had caught hold of his tail so as to get pulled along by him. Just as the tiger was about to reach the other end, he suddenly whisked round, in order to jeer at the fox, whom he believed to be far behind. But this motion exactly threw the fox safely on to the far end, so that he was able to call out to the astonished tiger: “Here I am. What are you so long about?”
      For this reason there are no tigers in Aino-land.


 


Aino Folktales (1888) Public Domain: http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/aino-folktales-1888/


A plethora of great stories here, kids! <3  Have fun:)

Text_notecard_shadow_top_right
Text_notecard_shadow_bottom
by Kalymi
704 Hits
16 Recommends