There once was an old woman with three little pigs, and as she had not enough to keep them, she sent them out on their merry way.



The first that went off met a man with a bundle of straw, and said to him:


“Please, man, give me that straw to build me a house.”


Which the man did, and the little pig built a house with it.



The second little pig met a man with a bundle of twigs, and said:


“Please, man, give me those twigs to build a house.”


Which the man did, and the pig built his house.



The third little pig met a man with a load of bricks, and said:


“Please, man, give me those bricks to build a house with.”


So the man gave him the bricks, and he started the long arduous task of building his home.



The first little pig finished his straw house so quickly that he had time to run to the market.


The second little pig finished his twig house so quickly that he had time to cook a roast beef.


The third little pig stayed home, working tirelessly on his house of brick.



Along the road came a wolf, who spotted the straw house and proceeded up the porch.


He knocked.  “Little pig, little pig, please let me in.”


To which the pig answered:


“Not by the hair of my chiny chin chin.”


The wolf then shouted at the top of his lungs:


“Then I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I’ll blow your house down.”


So he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew his house down, but the little pig had already snuck out the back.


And while the wolf searched the wreckage for traces of his next meal, the little pig ran to his friend’s house.



Angrier and more hungry than before, the wolf continued down the path and came upon the twig house of the second pig.


 “Little pig, little pig, let me come in.”


“Not by the hair of my chiny chin chin.”


“Then I’ll puff, and I’ll huff, and I’ll blow your house to the ground.”


So he huffed, and he puffed, and he puffed, and he huffed, and though it took all of his breath and energy, he knew the meal would be worth the effort, so he finally blew the house down.


Once again the sly little pigs were smarter than he. They had eluded his capture before he even took the first puff.  They ran together as fast as they could to their friend’s house.



So the wolf stumbled to the last home on the road. Upon seeing the brick home he knew he had not the strength to blow it down. So he knocked on the door.


And in his sweetest little girl voice he said:


“Little pig, little pig, let me come in. I’m running away from the big bad wolf.”


The door swung open but the little pig was nowhere to be seen.


“Shut the door, my deary, that wolf is but a stone’s throw away, I’m sure.”


Upon hearing the voice, a suspicion grew inside him and he knew the little pigs were hiding under the bed.


So he gently padded to the bed and withdrew the curtains, to see the little pig lying in bed wearing a bonnet and nightdress.


“Why little pig, what small nose you have.”


“The better to avoid the smells of the barnyard.”


“Why little pig, what small ears you have.”


“The better to avoid the noise from the cows.”


“Why little pig, what small eyes you have.”


“The better to see only the truth in people’s souls.”


Feeling weary from travel and tired as could be, the wolf seized the moment to pounce on the pig’s  weak frame.


When out from under the bonnet, Little Red Riding Hood sprang.


“Oh no! Not this again!”



The pigs were so thankful to have Red as their friend that they baked her a wolf’s pie to take to her gran. Then they fashioned her a new fur cloak, red from the blood and sent her on her way.


"We may look tired, weary and weak, but we're not dumb."


"True, though two of us did lose our homes."


"But at least we're never alone!"


Red smiled and hugged each of her little friends goodbye. As she turned to disappear back into the woods she waved a bloody hand.


“If another wolf bothers you, just come get me. And please do not distress. I’m actually getting quite good at this!”



The End.

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